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Manuscripts from the National Museum Library

The National Museum Library digitised five volumes in 2019. Four medieval manuscripts went through the library of the Augustinian canonry in Roudnice nad Labem, but most of them are of foreign origin: they include an older Italian Bible (XVI A 5), a manuscript comprising the first part of the work of Bartholomew of Urbino Milleloquium sancti Ambrosii, which probably comes from Italy as well (XV A 4), and a codex written in France, containing Biblical concordances of the Bible by Hugh of Saint-Cher (XVI A 4); the missal XVI A 10 from the third quarter of the 14th century is of Czech origin. The last manuscript is the Czech Didactics by John Amos Comenius, a copy made around 1630 with Comenius’s handwritten changes and notes (II B 8).

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Early Printed Books from the National Technical Library

The National Technical Library has provided access to twelve early printed books and their binder’s volumes from the 18th century. The printed books are written in German, with smaller parts in some being in French. In terms of content, these are mostly works on architecture. The oldest volume is an introduction to civil engineering by Augustin-Charles d'Aviler, printed in Amsterdam in 1700; some digitised prints contain only sets of copperplate engravings with views of individual buildings or their parts and their ground plans.

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A Printed Postil from the Town Museum and Gallery Polička

The Town Museum and Gallery Polička has provided access to the Sunday and holiday postil by Vojtěch Šebestián Scipio-Berlička, printed in the Jesuit printing workshop in the Old Town of Prague in 1667–1668 (shelf mark K 222). The book is enriched by a number of woodcuts illustrating the Biblical text presented.

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Manuscripts from the Regional Museum in Teplice

From the collections of the Regional Museum in Teplice, a thematically homogeneous collection of five codices, probably coming from the last third of the 17th century, was digitised in 2019. One of the manuscripts is written in Latin and contains ‘statuta philosophorum incognitorum’ and an unfinished copy of leafs written by the alchemist Michael Sendivogius; the others mostly use French and comprise sets of alchemical, medical, chemical, technical, and other guidelines and procedures. All codices are connected with the stay and activities of the alchemist Bartolomeus Mencelius at the castle in Teplice in the last third of the 17th century, after which they became part of the castle library of the Clary-Aldringen family.

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A Gradual from the Collections of the Regional Museum and Gallery in Most

The Regional Museum and Gallery in Most has provided access to a manuscript referred to as the Unfortunate Hymnal from Most from its collections. The codex contains hymns for the Mass, but also for the Liturgy of the Hours. It was made for the brotherhood of Corpus Christi and the Virgin Mary at the church of the Church of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary in Most. Based on a contract from 27 July 1537, the town of Most commissioned the making of the codex to the scribe and illuminator Jakub from Pilsen. The manuscript was to be completed by 15 October 1538. In fact, however, it was not handed over to the users until May 1544. It has been damaged by the cutting out of a number of leaves of the manuscript, including all with illuminated decoration.

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Manuscripts from the Regional Museum in Mikulov

From the Regional Museum in Mikulov, another five codices and their parts have been digitised. A copy of the theological dictionary Floretus, which, according to Czech marginal glosses, was written in the Czech lands (MIK 6373), is dated to the year 1416. Parts of the theological dictionary MIK 6369 are dated as well, specifically to 1475. Fragments of a missal from the 14th–15th centuries are deposited under the shelf mark MIK 6391. Modern manuscripts are represented by a copy of a part of the Third Order of Saint Francis (MIK 6390) and a collection of legal texts (MIK 6371).

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Digitised Documents from the Strahov Library

In 2019, the library of the Royal Canonry of Premonstratensians at Strahov provided access to 36 modern manuscripts and one early printed book – the Chronicle of Bohemia by Enea Silvio Bartolomeo Piccolomini (Pope Pius II), which was translated and in 1510 printed by Mikuláš Konáč of Hodíštkov (shelf mark DR IV 10). The digitised manuscripts are deposited under shelf marks DA I–DA III and come from between the 17the and 19th centuries. They are varied in their content as well, including e.g. a set of liturgical manuscripts of Premonstratensian provenance, some acquired as late as in the 19th century in the area of present-day Germany; scientific treatises in the fields of natural sciences and the humanities (e.g. by the geologist Jan Tadeáš Antonín Peithner of Lichtenfels and the art historian Jan Jakub Quirin Jahn); a binder’s volume of letters by Jesuit missionaries and their copies (DA II 15); poems and short stories; a copy of works of music by the Cistercian Johann Georg Vogt (DA II 20); an illuminated Kunst-Buch der Pferde (DA II 22); copies of theological works and lectures coming from the Prague Archiepiscopal Seminary; records of lectures and sermons given by Bernard Bolzano in 1808–1818; copies of various prints and other texts.

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Manuscripts of the Works of Johann Joseph Rösler in the Archives of the Prague Conservatoire

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Medieval Manuscripts from the National Library of the Czech Republic

Another group of digitised documents from the NL CR comprises 19 medieval codices. The oldest of them is manuscript IV.D.7, which was mostly written around the middle of the 11th century in the scriptorium of the Břevnov monastery, the earliest documented scriptorium in the Czech lands; it contains homilies on the Gospels by Pope Gregory I. The other codices also come from the Czech lands. They were written in the 13th–15th centuries. They include theological works (i.a. by the Church Fathers Augustine, Jerome, Gregory and Isidore of Seville), Biblical exegeses (e.g. by Haimo of Auxerre, Honorius of Autun, Nicholas of Lyra, Nicholas of Gorran), preaching and to a lesser extent ecclesiastical-legal texts, rhetorical, astronomical and philosophical texts. Liturgical manuscripts are represented by a breviary from the second half of the 13th century (IV.D.9), which was, based on some rubrics, most likely used at the church of St Vitus at Prague Castle. Illuminated manuscripts include IV.D.10 (a figural initial depicting the Virgin Mary and Baby Jesus, with two figures on the sides) and IV.E.19 (ornamental initials).

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Manuscripts from the North Bohemian Museum in Liberec

The North Bohemian Museum in Liberec digitised four modern manuscripts and a set of 27 official documents in 2018. The oldest manuscript is a workbook of poetics and grammar from the middle of the 17th century (Inv. No. ST 1753). Documents of official agenda comprise i.a. a book of the guild of drapers from Herrieden from 1729–1787 (Inv. No. ST 703) and the certificate of completed studies issued for Johann Georg Mayer (Inv. No. ST 241). The museum has further provided access to a set of guild statutes, baptismal certificates, vocational certificates, receipts and other documents (Inv. No. ST 143) from North Bohemia in 1527–1802.

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